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Vitamin D and Heart Disease Amarillo TX

New research points to the possibility of a genetic link between vitamin D and heart disease. People with high blood pressure who had a gene variant that reduces vitamin D activation in the body were found to be twice as likely as those without the variant to have congestive heart failure, the study found.

Bennie Ronald Fortner, MD
(806) 358-4596
PO Box 3856
Amarillo, TX
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Cardiology, Internal Medicine
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Medical School: Univ Of Tx Med Branch Galveston, Galveston Tx 77550
Graduation Year: 1966

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Prakashkumar K Desai, MD
(806) 358-4596
1901 Port Ln
Amarillo, TX
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Medical School: Bj Med Coll, Gujarat Univ, Ahmedabad, Gujarat, India
Graduation Year: 1984
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Hospital: Baptist St Anthonys Health Sys, Amarillo, Tx; Northwest Texas Hospital, Amarillo, Tx
Group Practice: Amarillo Heart Group

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Ismaile Sherine Abdalla, MD
(806) 358-4596
1901 Port Ln
Amarillo, TX
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Medical School: Univ Of Alexandria, Fac Of Med, Alexandria, Egypt (330-03 Pr 1/71)
Graduation Year: 1975
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Hospital: Coon Mem Hosp, Dalhart, Tx; Hereford Reg Medctr, Hereford, Tx; Ochiltree Hospital District, Perryton, Tx; Swisher Memorial Hospital, Tulia, Tx; Baptist St Anthonys Health Sys, Amarillo, Tx
Group Practice: Amarillo Heart Group

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William Glenn Peter Friesen, MD
(806) 352-7200
1215 S Coulter St Ste 302
Amarillo, TX
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Cardiology
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Medical School: Univ Of British Columbia, Fac Of Med, Vancouver, Bc, Canada
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Jon Luigi Haddad
(806) 358-4596
1901 Port Ln
Amarillo, TX
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Cardiology, Internal Medicine, Cardiovascular Disease

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Joaquin Martinez-Arraras, MD
(806) 358-4596
PO Box 3856
Amarillo, TX
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Medical School: Univ De Navarra, Fac De Med, Pampluna, S
Graduation Year: 1984

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Marc Moreau
(806) 358-4596
1901 Port Ln
Amarillo, TX
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Cardiology, Cardiovascular Disease

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Russell Frederick Burns, MD
(806) 356-5500
6700 W 9th Ave
Amarillo, TX
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Medical School: Univ Of Tx Med Branch Galveston, Galveston Tx 77550
Graduation Year: 1978

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Joaquin Martinez Arraras, MD
(806) 358-4596
1901 Port Ln
Amarillo, TX
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Cardiology, Internal Medicine
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Male
Education
Medical School: Univ De Navarra, Fac De Med, Pamplona, Spain
Graduation Year: 1982

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William Glenn Friesen
(806) 352-7200
1215 Coulter Suite 302
Amarillo, TX
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Cardiology, Cardiovascular Disease

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Vitamin D and Heart Disease

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THURSDAY, Dec. 3 (HealthDay News) -- New research points to the possibility of a genetic link between vitamin D and heart disease.

People with high blood pressure who had a gene variant that reduces vitamin D activation in the body were found to be twice as likely as those without the variant to have congestive heart failure, the study found.

The finding may lead to a way to identify people at increased risk for heart disease, according to Robert U. Simpson, an assistant professor of pharmacology at the University of Michigan Medical School and his research colleagues.

They analyzed the genetic profiles of 617 people. One-third had hypertension, one-third had hypertension and congestive heart failure, and the remaining third served as healthy controls.

The researchers found that a variant in the CYP27B1 gene was associated with congestive heart failure in people with hypertension. The study is in the November issue of Pharmacogenomics.

Previous research showed that mutations that inactivate the gene reduce the conversion of vitamin D into an active hormone.

"This study is the first indication of a genetic link between vitamin D action and heart disease," Simpson said in a news release from the University of Michigan.

"If subsequent studies confirm this finding and demonstrate a mechanism, this means that, in the future, we may be able to screen earlier for those most vulnerable and slow the progress of the disease," he added.

More information

The American Heart Association has more about congestive heart failure.

SOURCE: University of Michigan, news release, Dec. 1, 2009

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